Weimaraner Information

WEIMARANER INFORMATION

Today’s breed standards are alleged to have developed in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, although dogs having very similar features to the Weimaraner have supposedly been traced as far back as 13th century in the court of Louis IX of France. One theory is that the ancestor is the St. Hubert Hound (also known as the Bloodhound and Sleuth Hound)[verification needed]. Though these dogs are black, they can produce a grey dog when bred. Like the Vizsla when the breed was created exclusively for the nobility. The aim was to create a noble-looking, reliable gun dog. With its restricted ownership and natural instinct, the breed was highly prized and lived with the family. This was unusual since during this period hunting dogs were kept in kennels in packs. This has resulted in a dog that needs to be near humans and that quickly deteriorates when kenneled. The Weimaraner was an all-purpose family dog, capable of guarding the home, hunting with the family, and of course, being loving and loyal towards children.
Originally, Germany was possessive of its skilled all-purpose gun dog. Some of the earliest Weimaraners, before being sent to America for breeding, were sterilized in order for America not to popularize their special breed. But starting in the late 19th century the breed became increasingly common throughout Europe and the United States. Although slower than many other gun dogs, such as pointers, the Weimaraner is thorough, which made it a welcome addition to the sportsman’s household. The breed’s happy, lively temperament has endeared it to families. With the rise in popularity, some changes have been made to the breed. Both in Britain and America (where the breed remains popular) breeders have taken care to breed to a standard.

Description;

The Weimaraner is of medium size, athletic and quite sleek, with a beautiful distinctive smooth grey coat. His ears and head are slightly lighter in colour to that of the rest of his body-coat. His eyes may be blue, amber or grey; nose is grey; ears are somewhat large and pendant. His tope-line has a gentle slope from the withers down to the rear and does not dip in the middle.

IMPORTANTA Weimaraner with exaggerated features is the result of bad breeding.   CreditThe Breed Club Connection.

Health;

( Source; The Weimaraner Club of Great Britain )
DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY; A condition affecting the heart muscle. Not common but a low incidence reported.
DISTRICHIASIS; Extra eyelashes growing inwards. Should be removed. Low incidence noted.distichia-or-distichiasis-in-dogs/2136
ECTROPIAN; Lower eyelid turns outwards. Not common but cases noted. Corrective surgery necessary.
ENTROPIAN; Eyelids turn inwards. Not common but cases noted. Corrective surgery necessary.
EPILEPSY; Convulsions or fits are not common in this breed and can be controlled with medication.
A consortium of researchers from the Universities of Missouri, Minnesota, the Ohio State University and the Animal Health Trust in Great Britain are working together to discover the mutations responsible for hereditary epilespy in many breeds:
GASTRIC DILATATION AND VOLVULUS (GDV, Commonly known as ‘BLOAT’)
This is a life-threatening condition, which requires emergency treatment and there is an incidence of it in this breed. Ask your vet to tell you how to recognise it. The WCGB recommend that you feed your dog, when adult, twice a day in order not to overload the stomach. Pre-soak dry food before feeding. Don’t feed immediately before or after exercising. Don’t allow your dog to drink large quantities of water just before, during or just after exercising (small quantities are OK).
HIP DYSPLASIA; Ill fitting hip joints, not life threatening but causes extreme discomfort in affected dogs. The WCGB encourages members to X-ray breeding stock and submit plates to BVA/KC scheme to get a hip score.
INTERSEXUALITY; This is where both sets of sexual organs are present in the same animal. The condition is rare in this breed but cases have been noted. Requires corrective operation.
JUVENILE PYODERMAGASTRIC DILATATION AND VOLVULUS (GDV, Commonly known as ‘BLOAT’)
This is a life-threatening condition, which requires emergency treatment and there is an incidence of it in this breed. Ask your vet to tell you how to recognise it. The WCGB recommend that you feed your dog, when adult, twice a day in order not to overload the stomach. Pre-soak dry food before feeding. Don’t feed immediately before or after exercising. Don’t allow your dog to drink large quantities of water just before, during or just after exercising (small quantities are OK).
HIP DYSPLASIA; Ill fitting hip joints, not life threatening but causes extreme discomfort in affected dogs. The WCGB encourages members to X-ray breeding stock and submit plates to BVA/KC scheme to obtain a hip score.
INTERSEXUALITYThis is where both sets of sexual organs are present in the same animal. The condition is rare in this breed but cases have been noted. Requires corrective operation.
JUVENILE PYODERMA; Pustular skin condition with associated lymphadentis seen in puppies and young adults. Not common in the Weimaraner but cases noted. Requires treatment with medication.
PANCREATIC INSUFFICENCY; This is caused by the lack of enzymes normally produced by the pancreas. Not common in the Weimaraner but a low incidence has been reported. Can be treated with medication.Pustular skin condition with associated lymphadentis seen in puppies and young adults. Not common in the Weimaraner but cases noted. Requires treatment with medication.
PANCREATIC INSUFFICENCYThis is caused by the lack of enzymes normally produced by the pancreas. Not common in the Weimaraner but a low incidence has been reported. Can be treated with medication.
MCT (Mast Cell Tumours / Cancer)
Mast cell tumours are common among all dogs, both pedigree and mixed breeds, however the Animal Health Trust is investigating what they believe to be a genetic predisposition in the weimaraner based on evidence that there would seem to be a particularly high incidence of this form of cancer in the breed.
STEROID RESPONSIVE MENINGITIS; Incidences of this disease are becoming increasingly common in dogs, usually occurring in young male dogs aged up to 2 years old, however, the Animal Health Trust have noticed that there seems to be a particularly high incidence of the disease among some breeds, including the weimaraner.
SYRINGOMYELIA; This is a chronic progressive disease affecting the spinal cord. Rare in this breed but cases have been noted. No known treatment available to date.